Fairs and Festivals of Arunachal Pradesh

 

         Spring Time Festivals


The spring time festivals are celebrated during the period from January to April by the different groups. In the celebration of these festivals, the religious rites and the sacrifices are generally performed by their priests and assistants. 

         Losar Festival


The Losar festival of the Monpas, which is their new year, is celebrated for five days. On the eve of the festival, people clean their houses to usher in the New Year and to discard the old. The dirt and the grit of the old year are considered to symbolize ill health. During the five days of the festival, prayers are offered for prosperity and good health. Its highlights are the colourful Aji Lhamu dance, Lion and Peacock dance and the Yak dance. The festivities also include the hoisting of religious flags atop their homes, visiting the houses of friends and relatives, reading holy Buddhist articles in every house and lighting the butter lamps in the houses and the campuses.

 

         Reh Festival

Appeasement of the deities who control the peace and prosperity of the people is the theme behind the six day celebrations of the Reh festival, essentially associated with the Idu Mishmis. The festival comes to an end with great funfair. The priest dance performed during the six days is another special attraction of the festival.

 

         Ojiale Festival


The Wanhos celebrate their most popular festival, Ojiale during March-April, for a period of six to twelve days interspersed with prayer, song and dance. Villagers exchange bamboo tubes of rice beer as a mark of greeting and good will. Pig's skin is offered to the village chief as a mark of respect. 

         Tamladu Festival

Another important festival is Tamladu, essentially celebrated by the Digaru Mishmis tribe. During the festival, prayers are offered to the God of Earth and the God of Water for protection against natural calamities. The supreme Lord Jebmalu is worshipped for welfare of human beings, the standing crops and domestic animals.

 

         Khan Festival


This festival marks as an occasion for the reunion of the people. Besides the usual festivities, the significance of the festival lies in the ceremony whereby the priest ties a piece of wool around everyone's neck. The belief is that the enchanted thread will bring good luck to each of them. 

         Sangken Festival

Sangken festival is an occasion to bathe the images of Lord Buddha ceremoniously. 

         Thsi Festival

Thsi also heralds the New Year and people sprinkle water on each other as a sign of merriment. 

         Mopin Festival

One of the groups celebrates Mopin for wealth, prosperity, good health and universal happiness. Smearing of rice powder on each others' faces marks the beginning of the festival which is celebrated for five days. 

         Mol Festival

The Mol festival of the Tangsas is also celebrated for three days to welcome the New Year. 

         Torgya Festival


The Torgya Festival is a 3-day affair. This important festival signifies the destruction of evil spirit and harmful forces and seeks the rule of prosperity and happiness amongst the people. 

         Saka Dawa


Celebrated in the 4th month of the lunar calendar, the Saka Dawa festival marks Gautam Buddha's achievement of Nirvana.

 

         Dukpa Tse-Shi


The Dukpa Tse-Shi Festival celebrates the preaching of the Four Nobel Truths at Sarnath by Buddha. It falls in the 6th month of the Lunar calendar.

 

         Lhabab Duechen


In the 9th month of Monpa, the Lhabab Duechen Festival signifies the reincarnation of Buddha as Shakyamuni.

 

         Nyukom Yullow


Nyukom Festival of the Nyishis is celebrated on 26th February every year to propitiate the Gods for a good harvest.

         Solung


Solung is the colourful festival of the Adi Minyong group. The festivities last for seven days and the villagers prepare rice beer and store plenty of meat and vegetables for the joyous occasion. 

         Dree


Dree is the main festival of the Apatanis. It is celebrated on the 5th of July after the planting of paddy.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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